A Brief History Of The Abrahamic Mythologies

Where did Judaism, Christianity, and Islam really come from?

Allan Milne Lees

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Image credit: Jordan Archeological Museum

It is ironic that in general the people who fervently believe in a particular religion have little or no knowledge about the origins of their mythology. This ignorance of the basics means religionists are easy prey for anyone who deftly manipulates a few chosen elements; religionists too often therefore can readily be exhorted to commit all manner of unwelcome acts ranging from mild censorship all the way through to violent actions against others. As Voltaire wisely noted, “when you can make a person believe absurdities, you can make that person commit atrocities.”

It is therefore important for people to understand the origins of the myths in which they believe so that they understand how arbitrary and mashed-together their religious dogmas actually are. When you understand how your mythology has arisen, its antecedents, influences, and pieces copied wholesale from other myths, it hopefully will become slightly more difficult to go out and slaughter the neighbors merely because they don’t believe exactly the same dogma you do.

What follows in this article is the result of a great deal of study over many years. I’ve always been curious as to why people believe uncritically all manner of clearly non-demonstrable claims that are contrary to everything we know to be true about the universe in which we live. When I was younger I hoped that by studying religious mythologies I’d discover why so many seek certainty in half-baked fairytales. While the answer (people are basically suckers for simple-minded stories and rarely demand these tales make any sense) is unsatisfying, I did at least learn a great deal about the origin of contemporary mythologies, going all the way back to the Proto-Indo-Europeans and their contemporaries. I hope you, dear reader, will find this brief summary of all that information to be of some interest.

In addition to traditional scholarly materials, the YouTube channels Crecganford and Esoterica are also excellent sources of information and context for those who prefer more modern ways of absorbing interesting new knowledge and would like to go further than the necessarily limited scope of this article will permit. For those who prefer reading but don’t…

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Allan Milne Lees

Anyone who enjoys my articles here on Medium may be interested in my books Why Democracy Failed and The Praying Ape, both available from Amazon.